The Education in Zion Blog

During winter semester I was able to teach a few FHE groups that came into the gallery about some of the “Modern Legacies of Nauvoo,” specifically the temple. We talked about the sacrifices people make to get to the temple to receive blessings and make covenants with God.

A few weeks ago it was a sunny, but brisk Saturday. I decided that I would ride my bike to the temple instead of driving like I usually do. Arriving at the temple as a hot mess wasn’t going to be an issue, so I went for it.

I have a single speed bike (no shifting) and the temple is about three miles from my house, but it is also a steady uphill climb the whole way there. Needless to say, it wasn’t the wisest decision I’ve ever made. By the time I had made it to the MTC my thighs were slipping into the spirit world.

Then I remembered the story we shared in that FHE program from Silvia Allred:

 “In 1976, when we were living in Costa Rica, the mission president asked my husband to help organize the first trip from the mission to a temple. The Central America Mission then included Costa Rica, Panama, Nicaragua, and Honduras.  The closest temple was the Mesa Arizona Temple. The trip required us to travel five days each way, crossing six borders. The financial sacrifice for most of those who went was great. They sold their television sets, bikes, skates, and anything else they could sell. We traveled in two uncomfortable buses day and night. Some of the members had used all their money to pay for the bus fare and had taken only crackers and margarine to eat on the way.  I have never forgotten the great outpouring of the Spirit we experienced during the three days we spent at the Mesa Temple.” (General Conference October 2008, “Holy Temples, Sacred Covenants”)

For me the sacrifice is usually only one of time during a busy school week or a few hours on a free day, but twenty minutes of leg exhaustion wasn’t so bad when compared to the time and discomfort others have gone through to receive temple blessings.

What sacrifices do you make to go to the temple?

Dan Shirley, Gallery Educator

This Reflection post was written on June 8, 2012

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