Blog

January, 28, 2016

The Big Pond

by Alyssa Blake

BYU valley

That first day of school feeling never gets old to me, even as a 22 year-old college student. No matter how hard finals were the previous semester, it’s a good feeling to have new classes, new professors, and to be one semester closer to graduation. Progression is a wonderful feeling.

However,  after I buy all my textbooks, turn in my first assignments, and come to know my class schedule like the back of my hand, other emotions show up such as fear, anxiety, stress, sadness, disappointment, helplessness, heartbreak, loneliness, etc. Brigham Young University is a big pond, and it’s easy to feel like a very small fish. What do we do when we start to feel this way? In the gallery, there is a video of President Thomas S. Monson counseling the students of BYU. He says, “Should you become discouraged or burdened down, remember that others have passed this same way. They’ve endured and then have achieved. When we’ve done all that we’re able to do, we can then rely on God’s promised help.”

Our great heritage has showed us that if we get to the point in our trials where we feel like giving up, we have a Father in Heaven to rely on. We need to rely on Him and His son, our Savior Jesus Christ. If we do, we can meet our challenges with great strength and the ability to enjoy our journey. The video ends with this thought, “My young brothers and sisters, don’t take counsel of your fears. Don’t say to yourselves, ‘I’m not wise enough,’ or ‘I can’t apply myself sufficiently well to study this difficult subject or in this difficult field, so I shall choose the easier way.’ I plead with you to tax your talent, and our Heavenly Father will make you equal to those decisions.”

It’s a hard trail we’re blazing, but don’t let the big pond get you down. With Heavenly Father’s help, you’ll learn that you’re a bigger fish than you ever realized.

  1. Monson, Thomas S. “Life’s Greatest Decisions.” lds.org. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.
Share on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter