Tag: "BYU"

As I entered The Healer’s Art: a celebration of the College of Nursing during the College of Nursing 60th Anniversary celebration, I was immediately impressed! The video was entertaining and fun to watch. The display cases were put together well and very informative and the pictures on the wall were arranged in such an intriguing way. The information was also organized in an appealing way, helping to grab and to keep my attention.

I had the pleasure of going to the exhibit with my mother who graduated from BYU College of Nursing in 1976. Going with my mom made the idea of going to the exhibit even more fun.  I was able learn her perspective about her days as a student and learn about her having to work when dresses were being phased out.

The Healer’s Art evoked conversation between us about the past and made our mother-daughter nursing bond even stronger. This exhibit made me proud to be a nurse and proud to be a part of an occupation with such a rich history.

Not only is there a rich history for nursing in general, but BYU nursing. Learning the healer’s art has been the greatest joy I have even known. To put into action my desire to serve my fellow man and learn the skills that enable me to do so has been invaluable. I know that in order to honor those who went before me, I must enact the lessons I have learned in the past and forge the future. We students are the future, learning from foundations of the past.

Laura Boone, BYU Collegte of Nursing student

Music Fridays

General

During fall and winter semesters, the Education in Zion Gallery hosts individuals and student groups to showcase their musical talents on Fridays from noon to 1 pm. We have hosted harpists, violists, violinists, pianists, euphoniumists, and jazz groups. There is some incredible musical ability on this campus, and the gallery’s atmosphere lends itself to the gift of music.

Two weeks ago, we had a young man who spent an hour performing both modern songs and hymns with his personal arrangements. It was an especially wonderful hour to be in the gallery! His hymns, played against the backdrop of the magnificent Wasatch Mountains, were spiritually overwhelming. The other gallery educators and I wished we could have let him play for hours more.

That same day, a young man stopped at the desk as he ran up the spiral staircase. He told us he has class until 12:50, but runs to the gallery to listen to the last 10 minutes of Music Fridays. He is a musician himself and enjoys both the music and the talent of the students who perform. .

Come join us in the Education in Zion Gallery each Friday from 12 to 1 pm for the gift of music to refresh you before hurrying off to class. Join us, even if it is for only a few minutes. You will be very glad you did!

Reggie Voyce, gallery educator

The weekends are often quiet, but with President’s Day, last past weekend was even more quiet than normal. At the end of my Saturday shift, with less than 15 minutes until I would close the gallery, a group of visiting Chinese professors walked up the spiral staircase. They were guided by someone I recognized and I thought all was well. However, the man I knew quickly introduced them to me and then rushed off. I felt honored he had entrusted me with a group of foreign visitors, but also inadequate with my Chinese. I felt daunted by the task at hand, but keeping a prayer in my heart, I started the tour.

I talked about my interpretation of the symbols in the gallery and the aims of a BYU education—learning both the secular and the spiritual, building character, and fostering a desire of lifelong learning. I then continued talking about the history of the Church and its effort to educate the youth since its beginning.

These good people sat patiently, listening to my full discourse, now entirely in English with a few Chinese words interjected. I was anxious and nervous, worrying so much about their ability to understanding me that I forgot to allow moments of reflection. My audience seemed to find a real connection when I told them of the stories of BYU’s forefathers who had made many sacrifices and worked to perpetuate the future of the school. These Chinese professors shared their desires in educating and building the characters of their students.

Although our understandings of God are different, the truth is universal. Those who come to campus, and especially to the gallery, can feel a spirit of adherence to truth on this campus. I’m grateful for the chance to learn and I hope these professors have also gained something valuable from this experience.

Lucy Lu, gallery educator

Education in Zion has graciously welcomed an increase in guests since the beginning of Winter Semester, largely due to gallery-related class assignments. Although first-time visitors to the gallery are generally unsure of what lies beyond the spiral staircase, they most often find themselves pleasantly surprised. With the amazing influx of visitors, I have enjoyed witnessing guests’ reactions to the gallery.

Last week during my Wednesday night shift, a woman entered the gallery about an hour before closing time. She opted to walk around on a self-guided tour, but  she stopped by the information desk to share her experience when she finished.

The woman’s instructor had encouraged the class to read their patriarchal blessings prior to visiting the gallery so they might feel prompted about what paths to follow after leaving BYU. It was easy to see this woman had truly been touched by her experience. She told of how she believed the spirit of the gallery to be much like the spirit found in the temple.  Her experience added an entirely new dimension to my understanding of the gallery and the role it can play in the lives of those who visit.

Some individuals say they do not understand why they have been assigned to visit the gallery, while others believe that after one visit that there is nothing more to learn. However, after reading hundreds of pages of information and working at the gallery for three months, I know I am just beginning to recognize all this gallery has to offer. In fact, the file with all the label text and footnotes equals 150 pages, so  there is a lot information in the permanent exhibition.

The Education is Zion Gallery is filled with beautiful artwork and touching accounts of inspired individuals and the spirit of their sacrifices and testimonies can be felt strongly in the gallery. I firmly believe visiting Education in Zion will provide inspiration each and every time an individual accepts the opportunity to attend with an open mind and willing heart.

Melinda Clark, gallery educator