Tag: "Education in Zion"

Music Fridays

General

During fall and winter semesters, the Education in Zion Gallery hosts individuals and student groups to showcase their musical talents on Fridays from noon to 1 pm. We have hosted harpists, violists, violinists, pianists, euphoniumists, and jazz groups. There is some incredible musical ability on this campus, and the gallery’s atmosphere lends itself to the gift of music.

Two weeks ago, we had a young man who spent an hour performing both modern songs and hymns with his personal arrangements. It was an especially wonderful hour to be in the gallery! His hymns, played against the backdrop of the magnificent Wasatch Mountains, were spiritually overwhelming. The other gallery educators and I wished we could have let him play for hours more.

That same day, a young man stopped at the desk as he ran up the spiral staircase. He told us he has class until 12:50, but runs to the gallery to listen to the last 10 minutes of Music Fridays. He is a musician himself and enjoys both the music and the talent of the students who perform. .

Come join us in the Education in Zion Gallery each Friday from 12 to 1 pm for the gift of music to refresh you before hurrying off to class. Join us, even if it is for only a few minutes. You will be very glad you did!

Reggie Voyce, gallery educator

This fall, Education in Zion opened a photo exhibit at the bottom of the JFSB spiral staircase. The exhibit links Cosmo to the Four Aims of a BYU Education. It was a wonderful experience to reflect on the opportunities and benefits we are given as we are educated at BYU, but also to view fun photos of Cosmo living the aims!
How blessed we are to attend a university whose mission is to “assist individuals in their quest for perfection and eternal life.” BYU is not just focused on its students’ temporal knowledge and well-being, but their eternal education and welfare. This focus is clearly seen in the BYU aims.  According to the BYU website (aims.byu.edu), “A BYU education should be: spiritually strengthening, intellectually enlarging, character building, and leading to lifelong learning and service”.

We had a lot of fun putting together photos of Cosmo that related to each aim, including him leading hymns, studying, dancing, cleaning, and swimming. We even got to have a photo shoot with Cosmo in the gallery!

I am grateful for those who have sacrificed to make BYU an institution that provides such a wonderful eternal education for us. After checking out the Cosmo photo exhibit, come up the spiral stairs to the gallery and learn more about the people who dedicated their lives to BYU! Go cougars!

Courtesy of HBLL Special Collections

This gallery illuminates several examples of people who exerted themselves in order to receive visionary revelation. Some examples include: Joseph Smith, Karl G. Maeser, George H. Brimhall, and John M. Whitaker. In writing up that list, I noticed I didn’t list any women. I regretfully also noted how difficult it was for me to name any. In my defense, I can think of plenty of women who receive inspiration, but have these women received a singular visionary revelation? This is not to say that those monumental shifts are superior. In fact, I acknowledge those instances are certainly the exception to the rule, but I wanted to place some women on the list. I did gather a list of some names (LDS and non-LDS women) for further research. In my research, I came across Lucy Mack Smith, and I found some stories I really liked.


After six years of marriage, Lucy became very ill, was diagnosed with “confirmed consumption,” the disease from which her sisters Lovisa and Lovina had died. The doctors had given up hope and condemned her to death. Lucy stated she didn’t feel prepared for death and judgment at all. “I knew not the ways of Christ, besides there appeared to be a dark and lonesome chasm between myself and the Savior, which I dared not attempt to pass.” Though fatigued and bedridden, Lucy spent the night pleading with the Lord to spare her life so she could bring up her children and “be a comfort” to her husband.

“My mind was much agitated during the whole night . . . During this night, I made a solemn covenant with God, that, if he would let me live, I would endeavor to serve him according to the best of my abilities. Shortly after this, I heard a voice say to me, ‘Seek and ye shall find; knock and it shall be opened unto you. Let your heart be comforted; ye believe in God, believe also in me.’

Lucy’s recovery began immediately and she began her lifelong search for a religion that would teach her and her family the way of salvation.

Camlyn Giddins, Gallery Educator